FYI : The Dos’ And Don’s of Eyelash Extensions

The do’s and don’ts of eyelash extensions

Cory Marshall

CREATED May 19, 2014
TUCSON (KGUN9-TV) – Danielle Linscott loved everything about her eyelash extensions, “Lashes are awesome and like I said, they make you look great and it’s hassle free.”

“The amount of time it took me to get ready in the morning was minimized by half. I got them done regularly, every four weeks, never had an issue. The one time I went in, last year, it was bad,” Linscott said.

Pictures, taken last year, show Linscott’s eyes swollen shut two-days after receiving lash extensions. She says a trip to urgent care, a dose of steroids and antibiotics brought down the swelling.

“No, I think overwhelmingly eye lash extensions are quite safe and effective. A person needs to know whether or not they can be a good candidate though,” Tucson optometrists, Dr. Pamela Theriot said.

According to Theriot, adverse or allergic reactions to eyelash extensions, although relatively rare, can happen anywhere from five hours to two weeks after application. She suggests seeing an eye care professional immediately if you develop redness, tearing, swelling of the lids, loss of vision or mucus discharge.

“If you are under the care of an eye care professional for an eyelid or eyelash problem, it’s probably not the best idea to have the eyelash extensions,” Theriot said. “Also, if you tend to be a very allergic person and you have problems with normal cosmetics and you have to steer clear of lots of soaps and lotions, you’re not a good candidate for eyelash extensions.”

According to a recent study in Japan, the most common adverse reaction was to the lash glue or glue remover. Fewer also had reactions to the tape, placed under the eye during application.

A May 2013 Consumer Reports article also warns of potential heath risks tied to the procedure.

“I think lash extensions have such mixed reviews because there’s really, really good jobs and there’s really, really bad jobs,” Zully Greer, owner of The Lash Lounge, said.

In the eight years Greer has been applying lash extensions, she has only seen a handful of adverse reactions. Still, her shop is typically tasked with fixing those “bad jobs” when clients go elsewhere.

“That is a really bad eyelash,” Greer said, pointing to a single a lash, as coarse as a cactus.

“Cheaper is not always better and I always recommend going to a lash dedicated salon. It’s what we do and it’s what we know,” Greer continued.you want to do some research. “You want to make sure that the procedure takes anywhere from 1.5 – 2 hours. It’s very tedious, meticulous work. If it’s half-an-hour, they’re not lash extensions.”

The Lash Lounge owner recommends going to a licensed esthetician, certified in eyelash extensions. Optometrists also suggest making sure you are comfortable with the facility’s hygiene. Many licensed estheticians also offer free consultations, an opportunity optometrists say, to see if the salon’s hygiene is up to par.

“As long as you know and you research, and make sure you know where you’re going and who is applying them — and don’t settle for cheap because you get what you pay for, honestly,” Linscott added.

“They’re not bad. I loved them. I’ll get them again — just when I need to,” Linscott laughed.

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